Slavoj Zizek on antinatalism…

I know Zizek is the hot philosopher right now, but I don’t know much about him. These quotes from him, however, are very good:

If you could edit your past, what would you change?
My birth. I agree with Sophocles: the greatest luck is not to have been born – but, as the joke goes on, very few people succeed in it.

What is the most important lesson life has taught you?
That life is a stupid, meaningless thing that has nothing to teach you.

I got them from Efilism/Antinatalism.

In the opposition between life and death, I’m for death. That’s why I love Von Trier’s Melancholia – all life on Earth disappears, so I think it’s a film with a happy ending.
Slavoj Zizek, webchat in the Guardian

Thanks to Michael in the comments for this one.

8 thoughts on “Slavoj Zizek on antinatalism…

  1. Michael July 27, 2013 at 09:11 Reply

    Well you gotta love Slavoj Žižek for his honesty.

    I hesitated to quote from the efilism blog. You know why? The efilism blog says the whole (yes the whole) interview can be found here.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/aug/09/slavoj.zizek

    But the 2nd quote only says

    “That life is a stupid, meaningless thing that has nothing to teach you” Slavoj Žižek

    The article does not say the following

    What is life’s lesson anyways? What is this stupid game all about? Is it really about a chemical process perpetuating itself through its DNA vehicles for no reason in a cold, careless materialistic universe and all it does is make its agents suffer again and again with no reward or compensation or meaning? Is it an all-encompassing futility that cannot be rationalized away and put on the back-burner while one attends to their needs/desires that were never supposed to exist? Yes it is!..etc.

    I find this suspicious. I think this needs clarification.

  2. ardegas July 27, 2013 at 22:10 Reply

    What is life’s lesson anyways?… That’s an elaboration from the blogger, not part of the original interview.

  3. Irina August 24, 2013 at 15:47 Reply

    Unfortunately, Dima (Efilism/Antinatalism) doesn’t always make clear where the quote ends and his own thoughts begin. Slavoj Žižek did say he regretted being born and that his fear was to awaken after death in that interview. But that’s all, unfortunately. I wish he did say more (((

    • Brian L March 13, 2015 at 10:34 Reply

      Is the fear that he would awaken in that interview, or that he’d merely awaken lol!

      Sorry, couldn’t resist. :)

  4. Michael October 8, 2014 at 11:51 Reply

    ‘In the opposition between life and death, I’m for death. That’s why I love Von Trier’s Melancholia – all life on Earth disappears, so I think it’s a film with a happy ending.’ Slavoj Zizek, webchat in the Guardian

  5. Michael October 29, 2014 at 09:34 Reply

    Slavoj Zizek: Lars von Trier’s Melancholia, I think, it’s a basically, I’m not kidding, optimistic film, even as we know at the end the planet Melancholia hits the earth, we all die. But I find something beautifully poetical in the attitude of the main person, Justine, played by Kirsten Dunst, no, this inner peace, how she accepts this.

    I claim that we should not read this as kind of a pessimism. “Oh, we all die. Who cares?” No, if you really want to do something good for society, if you want to avoid all totalitarian threats and so on, you basically should go . . . we should all go to this, let me call it–although I’m a total materialist–fundamentally spiritual experience of accepting that at some day everything will finish, that at any point the end may be near. I think that, quite on the contrary of what may appear, this can be a deep experience which pushes you to strengthen ethical activity.

    The result of this experience is not, “Oh, the end may be near, so let’s kill, let’s just enjoy,” and so on. No, it’s the opposite. Again, paradoxically, I claim it’s not a superficially but profoundly optimistic film.

    • Francois Tremblay October 29, 2014 at 14:13 Reply

      Thank you! I will put this video on the blog at some point.

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