New study: 17%-41% of teenage girls report being raped.

Why is this not being talked about more right now? A new study came out done on 4500 teenagers in five European countries and part of the results were on abuse: online, emotional, physical and sexual. The percentage of teenage girls reporting being raped by a partner were the following:

Bulgaria- 21%
Cyprus- 17%
England- 41%
Italy- 35%
Norway- 28%

This is a huge result which undermines the credibility of all the estimations of lifetime rape we’ve been working with. One on five or one on four are probably a gross underestimation, as I’ve always suspected. Please spread this data on all feminist channels you have access to. This needs to be discussed!

4 thoughts on “New study: 17%-41% of teenage girls report being raped.

  1. Independent Radical February 19, 2015 at 20:10 Reply

    I don’t deny that rape is common, but you might want to find a better study. This one places being “pressured you into intimate touching or something else” and being “physically forced you into having sexual intercourse” in the same category of “sexual violence”. Furthermore, while most women in the study had negative experiences, between 60% and 75% of boys (who experience “sexual violence”) reported a positive or no effect response. Either we have to accept the idea that rape can be fun and that women are being “too sensitive” and should learn to like being raped or this study’s definition of sexual violence is too broad.

    There are other studies that clear show that the amount of rape experienced by young women is alarmingly high and these studies have clearer definitions of rape. I recommend checking out a talk called “Rape Myths on Trial”. It has a good discussion of how to conduct studies on rape and sexual. It is also a good documentary on sexual assault in general.

    • Francois Tremblay February 19, 2015 at 22:17 Reply

      ” Either we have to accept the idea that rape can be fun and that women are being “too sensitive” and should learn to like being raped or this study’s definition of sexual violence is too broad.”

      What are you arguing exactly? That only PIV can be rape? Because I absolutely reject that notion.

      “Either we have to accept the idea that rape can be fun and that women are being “too sensitive” and should learn to like being raped or this study’s definition of sexual violence is too broad.”

      What the fuck? The fact that women don’t consider some forms of rape to be rape because of how we minimize male sexual aggression, and liking the act in that context, does NOT mean it’s not rape or that rape is fun! How could you say a thing like that?

      Please, for the love of God, clarify your position, because right now I’m flabbergasted.

      • Independent Radical February 20, 2015 at 04:27 Reply

        “What are you arguing exactly? That only PIV can be rape? Because I absolutely reject that notion.”

        No, I do not think that vaginal intercourse is the only kind of rape (though the study referenced intercourse, not vaginal intercourse, specifically), but “intimate touching” strikes me as somewhat vague. I would consider hugging and kissing to be “intimate touching”. I don’t encourage people to pressure others into “intimate touching”, whatever that is, but it may not fall into the category of “rape”. It could be sexual harressment, which is still harmful and wrong, but not in the same category as rape. Male aggression does exist along a spectrum with some actions being more harmful and coercive than others.

        “… does NOT mean it’s not rape or that rape is fun! How could you say a thing like that?”

        According to the study, it’s the males (who say they were victims of sexual violence) who said it was fun (or not harmful). The majority of the males (between 60% and 75%) said that their experience of sexual violence either made them feel good or did not harm them. I think this is a very unlikely outcome if the boys had in fact been sexually assaulted. I think most of the boys were pressured into doing something sexual and found it flattering that their girlfriends were so eager, while most of the females in the study were in fact forced to engage in sexual activity.

        If we accept that the males actually experienced sexual violence and liked it, then we are stuck accepting that rape is no big deal. I don’t think we actually should accept this conclusion, which is why I think there might be an issue with their definition of “sexual violence”. It may just be an issue of wording, but I don’t think the males in the study would have responded the way they did if they actually had experienced sexual violence.

        I apologise if my initial comment was not clear. I definitely do not think rape is fun and was trying to make the point that the male’s perception of it as fun meant that they probably did not actually experience sexual violence, but something about the study caused them to say that they had.

        • Francois Tremblay February 20, 2015 at 04:38 Reply

          “No, I do not think that vaginal intercourse is the only kind of rape (though the study referenced intercourse, not vaginal intercourse, specifically), but “intimate touching” strikes me as somewhat vague. I would consider hugging and kissing to be “intimate touching”. I don’t encourage people to pressure others into “intimate touching”, whatever that is, but it may not fall into the category of “rape”.”

          I assume that it means touching of a sexual nature, since it is after all in the “sexual” category. But if they asked the question just like that, then yes, I agree that it could be ambiguous. I can’t find any answer on this elsewhere in the paper or on their site.

          “According to the study, it’s the males (who say they were victims of sexual violence) who said it was fun (or not harmful). The majority of the males (between 60% and 75%) said that their experience of sexual violence either made them feel good or did not harm them.”

          Well, I’m not really concerned about the male statistics. I mean, yes, young men are indoctrinated to want to be sexual and that they shouldn’t refuse sex if they’re “real men,” but I’m not following you when you say that means it can’t be sexual violence. I mean, it’s a different category of violence from that inflicted on women, so we can’t really compare apple and oranges here. Physically, unless he is much younger or in a position of subordination, the man is the one in control of the situation.

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