Pro-choice arguments open the door to anti-abortion advocates.

I’ve already discussed at length why pro-choice arguments are just as fallacious as the anti-abortion arguments. But in this entry, Heretic makes a case that pro-choice arguments leave the door wide open for anti-abortion lines of reasoning to put their foot in.

Moral disagreement: There is nothing inherently wrong with abortion, and in fact, it is safer than the health issues resulting from pregnancy. We legislate based on what we think is morally right/wrong all the time even though people will do things anyway in spite of the law. If you claim that abortion is wrong, you are giving ammo to make it illegal or impose cutoff points. Then it comes down to “choosing life over murder/death”: “i myself don’t support abortion, but i can’t stop women from having them” or (per notcisjustwoman)” I don’t agree with abortion, but I guess I will allow it,” etc. It is a slippery slope.

8 thoughts on “Pro-choice arguments open the door to anti-abortion advocates.

  1. sbt42 December 16, 2015 at 05:32 Reply

    “Sometimes the only way to win is to not play!”

    I saw this mini-game, and I immediately thought of your blog.

    http://games.alienbill.com/preggers/

    • Independent Radical December 16, 2015 at 17:21 Reply

      I got over 200,000 in that game by moving the egg in a slow circle and getting most of the sperm to stick together.

      As for avoiding pregnancy in real life. We know the easiest way to do that is to be biological male. Unfortunately half of us already lost that game.

      “We legislate based on what we think is morally right/wrong all the time even though people will do things anyway in spite of the law. If you claim that abortion is wrong, you are giving ammo to make it illegal or impose cutoff points.”

      I think this argument makes sense with regard to abortion because it is such a politicised topic at the moment, but I dislike with the implication that all behaviour deemed immoral will eventually be made illegal.

      I can think of a number of objectionable behaviours (smoking for instance) that are not illegal even though the government has tried to combat them (in Australia). Liberals often assume that the only means of dealing with an objectionable behaviour is making it illegal, but in reality, people and governments have many other mechanisms for discouraging harmful practices.

      I bring this up because liberals will use the claim that deeming something immoral automatically leads to bans to argue that the practices they like should never be criticised (horribly hypocritical, I know). Whether a behaviour will be banned depends a great deal on the character of the debate surrounding the issue, not just on whether the behaviour is labelled immoral.

      • Francois Tremblay December 18, 2015 at 05:54 Reply

        Yea, I tried the slow circle too. It worked pretty well.

        I don’t think the point is necessarily that what is morally wrong should be illegal, but that anything which is not morally wrong should not be illegal. For example, we should not make drug use illegal, as it is used (amongst other motives) by people who have been damaged in childhood and try to keep control over their emotions. if it is morally good for them to take drugs, then it should not be illegal.

        I may be sidetracking here. I agree that what is morally wrong should not necessarily be illegal. I also agree with you that liberal shy away from labeling things as wrong because they automatically think that means it should be illegal.

        Either way, as an antinatalist, I believe having children is wrong, but I do think that passing a law against all procreation right now would be ridiculously impossible. Laws similar to those in China may be more realistic, but even those are very unevenly enforced.

  2. jigenryu778 December 17, 2015 at 01:51 Reply

    Not to sound whiny, but I wish somebody would right something about LGBT’s. Ever since the ruling, people have basically quit talking about us.

    • jigenryu778 December 17, 2015 at 01:52 Reply

      Crap, typo!

      I meant write.

    • Francois Tremblay December 17, 2015 at 02:03 Reply

      Yea… I won’t be the one to do it, I’m afraid.

      • jigenryu778 December 18, 2015 at 06:53 Reply

        How come?

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